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Mouse Anti-O’nyong’nyong Virus VLP (AE10)

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LGC-MAB12358
AUD792.00

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Description

MOUSE ANTI-O’NYONG’NYONG VIRUS VLP (AE10)

Mouse anti O’nyong’nyong virus VLP (AE10) monoclonal antibody recognises O’nyong’nyong Envelope proteins and VLP in ELISA.

 

PRODUCT DETAILS – MOUSE ANTI-O’NYONG’NYONG VIRUS VLP (AE10)

  • Mouse anti O’nyong’nyong virus VLP (AE10) monoclonal antibody.
  • Suitable for use in ELISA.
  • Purified by Protein G Sepharose chromatography.
  • Presented in phosphate buffered saline, pH 7.2.

 

BACKGROUND

O’nyong’nyong virus (ONNV) is a mosquito-borne RNA virus of the Togaviridae family and was first isolated in June 1959 from serum samples from febrile patients in the northern province of Uganda. ONNV and Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) are both alphaviruses and are closely related, both antigenically and genetically. ONNV infects both anopheline (primarily A. funestus and A. gambiae) and culicine mosquitoes, whereas CHIKV infects only culicine mosquitoes. ONNV is unique in that it is the only alphavirus, and one of few viruses in general, to be transmitted to humans by the bite of an anopheline mosquito.

The name O’nyong’nyong is derived from the Nilotic language of Uganda and Sudan and means “weakening of the joints”. ONN is a self-limiting febrile (illness that suddenly occurs with an onset of fever) viral disease, meaning that it follows a temporary course and usually will resolve by itself without the need for medical intervention. It is characterized by severe joint pain, followed by a maculopapular rash (flat, red area on the skin that is covered with small confluent bumps) in 60-70% of cases. Buccal and palatal enanthema (rash) can occur and unapparent infections are common. The incubation period for ONNV infection is approximately 8 weeks. Symptoms may last from 1 week to several months, which has an economic impact in regions affected due to loss of working days. The disease is often confused with measles, malaria, dengue, rubella or chikungunya.

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